Friday, May 22, 2020

A Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery Oconnor Essay example

In her well-known short story, â€Å"A Good Man Is Hard to Find,† Flannery O’Connor skillfully describes the difficulty of finding a morally upright human being, whether it is a man or a woman. No one is perfect, everyone has inadequacies and shortcomings, and she presents this cleverly in her story. She is able to support this view of mankind through her characters. They are self-centered, egotistical human beings who can be judged by their words and actions. This is especially true of the protagonist (the grandmother) and the antagonist (the Misfit). The grandmother tries to portray herself as a virtuous woman, but in the end O’Connor shows that her actions are always self-serving and that morally, she is not that different from the Misfit.†¦show more content†¦If she were the upstanding person she claims to be, then telling a lie would go against her strong conscience. She knows Bailey does not want to take the cat on the trip because she states, â₠¬Å"Bailey, didn’t like to arrive at a motel with a cat† (O’Connor 357). O’Connor uses this specific action of the grandmother, the conscious decision to lie and to manipulate, to show she is not the virtuous woman she claims to be. As the family travels down the road, the grandmother carries on a conversation with her grandchildren. She is quick to admonish the children when they speak poorly about Georgia and Tennessee. She tells the children, â€Å"In my time†¦children were more respectful of their native states and their parents and everything else† (O’Connor 358). Again, the grandmother is presenting herself as an upright lady. However, in the very next sentence she says, â€Å"Oh look at the cute little pickaninny!† (O’Connor 358). She wants to be viewed as a moral lady, yet she does not have a problem using a derogatory term for a Negro child. Here again her strong conscience should have been her guide and she should not have used that word in front of her grandchildren. She has many flaws, but she is not willing to admit them. Eventually the family stops for barbecued sandwiches at a place called The Tower. The owner of the business, Red Sammy, joins the family at their table. Sammy tells the family, â€Å"These days you don’t know who toShow MoreRelatedA Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor1196 Words   |  5 PagesA prolific writer, famously known as Flannery O’Connor in 1953, wrote the short narrative titled â€Å"A Good Man is Hard to Find† (Scott 2). However, it was published two years later in 1955, in her second collection of short stories. This particular collection presented the author as a key voice in the ancient American literature world until she met her sudden death in 1964 when she was only 39. The collection also won her tremendous fame, especially concerning her unmatchable creativity and masteryRead MoreA Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor748 Words   |  3 PagesFlannery O’Connor’s Southern Gothic short story, â€Å"A Good Man is H ard to Find,† is one of sudden violence; although, it begins rather uneventful (Kaplan 1). Bailey, his wife, and their children, John Wesley, June Star, and a baby boy, are all looking forward to a trip to Florida. Grandmother, Bailey’s mom, wants to go to east Tennessee to see her relatives, not Florida. She uses an article in the newspaper that tells of an escaped criminal, the Misfit, which is headed to Florida to try to persuadeRead MoreA Good Man Is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor645 Words   |  3 PagesA Good Man â€Å"She would have been a good woman†¦if it had been somebody there to shoot her every minute of her life† (Gardner). Flannery O’Connor’s â€Å"A Good Man is Hard to Find† tells of Bailey, his wife, their three children and Bailey’s mother all heading to Florida for vacation. In this paper I will summarize the story, and discuss the irony of the story and the morality and religion in the story. The family, Bailey, his wife, three children and his mother, are set to go on vacation to FloridaRead MoreA Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor 664 Words   |  3 PagesIn the story â€Å"A Good Man is Hard to Find† Flannery OConnor uses the grandmother as a person who gets what she wants. At first she doesnt want to go to Florida she wants to visit her relatives in Tennessee. We also learn she is manipulative when she tries to change Baileys (her son) mind. Whenever something doesnt go her way she wants she isnt pleased. She uses the story of the Misfit to scare the family so that they would go to Tennessee. Something else the grandmother says about herself inRead More The Journey in A Good Man Is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor690 Words   |  3 PagesThe Journey in A Good Man Is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor In A Good Man Is Hard to Find, Flannery OConnors character searches for grace and redemption in a world full of sin. Grimshaw states, each one, nonetheless, is free to choose, free to accept or reject Grace (6). The Grandmother in A Good Man is Hard to Find, is on a journey for grace and forgiveness in a world where the redemption she is searching for proves to be hard to find. The Grandmother often finds herself at oddsRead More A Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor Essay1204 Words   |  5 PagesA Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  In the short story, A Good Man is Hard to Find, the main character is the grandmother. Flannery OConnor, the author, lets the reader find out who the grandmother is by her conversations and reactions to the other characters in the story. The grandmother is the most important character in the story because she has a main role in the stories principal action. This little old lady is the protagonist in this piece. We learn more about her fromRead MoreEssay on A Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor1564 Words   |  7 PagesA Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor A Good Man is Hard to Find is an extremely powerful commentary that elucidates Flannery OConnors opinions about religion and society. Like the majority of her other works, A Good Man is Hard to Find has attracted many interpretations based on Christian dogma (Bandy 1). These Christian explications are justified because Miss OConnor is notorious for expressing Catholic doctrines through her fiction. Once she even remarked I see fromRead MoreA Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery O’Connor Essay1033 Words   |  5 Pages â€Å"A Good Man is Hard to Find,† written by Flannery O’Connor tells the story of a dysfunctional family headed to vacation and their inevitable death. The family, including their matriarch, the grandmother, represents the delusion perfection that many modern Christians have. The family displays an extreme sense of vanity, self-centeredness, and disobedience during the first half of the story. The first half of the story does not follow a specific pattern nor does it hold significance to the family’sRead MoreA Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor Essay1959 Words   |  8 Pages Who is the Misfit? In the short story, â€Å"A Good Man Is Hard to Find† a family comprising of a grandmother, a father, three children, and a wife is headed on vacation has the misfortune of meeting a murderous band of serial killers. The Misfit and his band of serial killers are recently escapees of a federal prison. In the following paragraphs this paper looks into the issues of, what one would do in a situation such as that and the background of the the family and murderers as well. The MisfitRead More Symbolism in A Good Man Is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor1038 Words   |  5 PagesUse of Symbolism in A Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor A Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor is a short story that depicts a familys vacation to Florida that turned into an abysmal tragedy when they met with the Misfit, a convict who escaped from prison. This story is meant to be interpreted as a parable, whereby OConnor made skilful use of symbolism to bring about messages such as the class-consciousness and the lack of spiritual faith that exist amongst human.

Sunday, May 10, 2020

The Education Framework Of Nigeria - 1479 Words

Presentation Education is said to be act or procedure of bestowing or securing general learning, building up the forces of thinking and judgment, and by and large of setting oneself up or others mentally for experienced life. The Ministry of Education is responsible for education in Nigeria. The education framework in Nigeria is separated into Kindergarten, essential training, auxiliary training and tertiary training. Foundation Problem The present example of Nigeria Education framework, especially the Tertiary Institutions has been an issue of sensitivity toward the administration, accomplices, educationists, managers (home and abroad), graduates and diverse establishments. This paper took a gander at the present pattern of tertiary education as far as educational modules, instructors, students, funding, facilities, industrial collaborations and additionally showing techniques with the point of view of proposing the way ahead. Writing Review Nigeria is as often as possible implied as the Giant of Africa, inferable from its inconceivable people and economy. With around 184 million occupants, Nigeria is the most jammed country in Africa and the seventh most swarmed country on the planet. Nigeria has one of the greatest masses of youth on the planet. Starting 2015, Nigeria was named the world s twentieth greatest economy, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion to the extent apparent GDP and purchasing power balance exclusively. It surpassed South Africa to twistShow MoreRelatedA Report On Nigerian Training Framework1422 Words   |  6 Pagesof thinking and judgment, and by and large of setting oneself up or others mentally for experienced life. The Ministry of Education is responsible for instruction in Nigeria. The instruction framework in Nigeria is separated into Kindergarten, essential training, auxiliary training and tertiary training. Foundation Problem The present example of Nigeria training framework, especially the tertiary association has been an issue of sensitivity toward the administration, accomplices, educationistsRead MoreReasons For Socio Economic Rights1515 Words   |  7 Pagesthe right to education; and (vi) the right to participate in cultural life and enjoy the benefits of scientific progress’. Considering the scope of socio-economic rights, why is it less susceptible to international criminalisation? As argued in chapter six, the research answered the question that socio-economic rights quite unlike civil and political rights has retained second-rank status in practice and this has influenced the lower status accorded to it in most domestic legal frameworks. Besides,Read MoreEssay On Sex Women In Nigeria1020 Words   |  5 Pagesand women for different exploitative purposes – prostitution, begging and all forms of domestic work (Ehindero et al., 2006). Gap in the Literature By and large, there is a lack of up-to-date knowledge on the dynamics of international migration in Nigeria. Though it is a general discourse that there is a â€Å"massive outflow† of Nigerians, the dynamics of the volume, directions of the flows and other aspects of international migrations are still indefinite. Coupled with these are the methodological problemsRead MoreGrand Corruption ‘Consists Of Acts Committed At A High1522 Words   |  7 Pagesvery dangerous social phenomenon plaguing Nigeria since the colonial era, which legal and institutional efforts to combat it over the years have taken many forms. However, the persistence of grand corruption in Nigeria arguably infringes on the realisation of certain human rights. Metaphorically, corruption is referred to as ‘public enemy number one’ that needs to be combatted using a holistic approach. The endemic nature of grand corruption in Nigeria provokes such rhetorical questions as: is itRead MoreSub Sa haran Afric Developing The World With Its Most Formidable Essay1167 Words   |  5 Pagesimproving the standard of living in the African region. Community developmentis highlighted as a unique form of practice, with its intrinsic orientation towards democraticand participatory outcomes of collective change, inclusion and equality.Adult Education and Community Development compliments each other in the bid toameliorate and alleviate the living conditions of people. In developing countries where manypeople are living in rural communities, they are veritable instrumentsRead MoreThe Millenium Declaration Goals 20001758 Words   |  7 Pages2015. In this Millennium Declaration, It was chosen by the world pioneers to outline a system for advancement embodying eight Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s): 1. Eradication of extreme poverty and hunger 2. Achievement of universal primary education 3. Promotion of gender equality and empowerment of women, 4. Reduction of child mortality 5. Improvement in maternal health 6. Combating HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases, 7. Ensuring environmental sustainability and 8. Develop a globalRead MoreConflict Management And Visionary Leadership971 Words   |  4 PagesThis paper will synthesize in groups, topics and subtopics of articles previously used in week four and five of this course. These articles are about conflict management styles in various organizations using Nigeria as a case study. The authors Kaban Conar (2012) wrote this article â€Å"Conflict Management and Visionary Leadership† to find efficient conflict measures to resolve conflict without harming institution targets and activities. Prause and Mujtab (2015) looked into the current â€Å"Current ManagementRead MoreThe Education System Of Nigeria2136 Words   |  9 PagesIntroduction Education is said to be act or procedure of bestowing or securing general learning, building up the forces of thinking and judgment, and by and large of setting oneself up or others mentally for experienced life. The Ministry of Education is responsible for education in Nigeria. The education framework in Nigeria is separated into Kindergarten, primary education, secondary education and tertiary education. 2.1 Foundation Problem The present example of Nigeria Education system, especiallyRead MoreA Brief Note On Guinea Worm Eradication ( Group 7 )1477 Words   |  6 Pagesin three Local Government Areas of Akoko town in Ondo State Nigeria by the State’s Ministry of Health among people aged 6-46 years. Their rationale was based on high density of cases in Ise, Auga-Okemole and Iboropa areas of Akoko local government areas, after WHO had declared Nigeria free of the infection. Based on continuous surveillance and disease notification, it seems guinea worm is a WHO’s notifiable infectious disease, and Nigeria is a party to it. According to WHO 2000), there is a need forRead MoreLeadership Roles And Its Impact On Organizations Essay1705 Words   |  7 Pagesleadership and leaders in any organization is crucial to its continuity and profitability. Leadership as a function in an organization determines the motivation of employees, working culture and efficiency among others. Countries in Africa such as Nigeria and other European countries face the same needs in terms of leadership. Background of the study Every organization is a social setup that is separate from the environment in which it exists and pursues its own goals as well as controlling its performance

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The “Homeless” Free Essays

Children†s health Many people call or write the National Coalition for the Homeless to ask about the number of homeless people in the United States. There is no easy answer to this question, and in fact, the question itself is misleading. In most cases, homelessness is a temporary circumstance — not a permanent condition. We will write a custom essay sample on The â€Å"Homeless† or any similar topic only for you Order Now A more appropriate measure of the magnitude of homelessness is therefore the number of people who experience homelessness over time, not the number of â€Å"homeless people. † Studies of homelessness are complicated by problems of definitions and methodology. This fact sheet describes definitions of homelessness, methodologies for counting homeless people, recent estimates of homelessness, and estimates of the increase in homelessness over the past two decades. Additional resources for further study are also provided. As a result of methodological and financial constraints, most studies are limited to counting people who are literally homeless — that is, in shelters or on the streets. While this approach may yield useful information about the number of people who use services such as shelters and soup kitchens, or who are easy to locate on the street, it can result in underestimates of homelessness. Many people who lack a stable, permanent residence have few shelter options because shelters are filled to capacity or are unavailable. A recent study of 30 U. S. cities found that in 1998, 26% of all requests for emergency shelter went unmet due to lack of resources (U. S. Conference of Mayors, 1998). In addition, a review of homelessness in 50 cities found that in virtually every city, the city’s official estimated number of homeless people greatly exceeded the number of emergency shelter and transitional housing spaces (National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty, 1999). Moreover, there are few or no shelters in rural areas of the United States, despite significant levels of homelessness (Aron and Fitchen, 1996). As a result of these and other factors, many people who lack permanent housing are forced to live with relatives and friends in crowded, temporary arrangements. People living in unstable housing arrangements who lack a permanent place to stay are experiencing a kind of homelessness, but because they are not â€Å"literally homeless,† they will not be counted. Researchers use different methods to measure homelessness. One method attempts to count all the people who are literally homeless on a given day or during a given week (point-in-time counts). A second method of counting homeless people examines the number of people who are homeless over a given period of time (period prevalence counts). Choosing between point-in-time counts and period-prevalence counts has significant implications for understanding the magnitude and dynamics of homelessness. The high turnover in the homeless population documented by recent studies (see below) suggests that many more people experience homelessness than previously thought, and that most of these people do not remain homeless. Because point-in-time studies give just a â€Å"snapshot† picture of homelessness, they only count those who are homeless at a particular time. Over time, however, some people will find housing and escape homelessness while new people will lose housing and become homeless. Systemic social and economic factors (prolonged unemployment or sudden loss of a job, lack of affordable housing, domestic violence, etc. ) are frequently responsible for these episodes of homelessness. Point-in-time studies do not accurately identify these intermittently homeless people, and therefore tend to overestimate the proportion of people who are chronically homeless — particularly those who suffer from severe mental illness and/or addiction disorders and who therefore have a much harder time escaping homelessness and finding permanent housing. For these reasons, point-in-time counts are often criticized as misrepresenting the magnitude and nature of homelessness. There is another important methodological issue that should be considered. Regardless of the time period over which the study was conducted, many people will not be counted because they are not in places researchers can easily find. This group of people, often referred to as â€Å"the unsheltered† or â€Å"hidden† homeless, frequently stay in automobiles, camp grounds, or other places that researchers cannot effectively search. For instance, a national study of formerly homeless people found that the most common places people who had been literally homeless stayed were vehicles (59. 2%) and makeshift housing, such as tents, boxes, caves, or boxcars (24. 6%) (Link et al. , 1995). This suggests that homeless counts may miss significant numbers of people who are literally homeless, as well as those living in doubled-up situations. There are at least four widely used national estimates of homelessness. Many are dated, or based on dated information. For all of the reasons discussed above, none of these estimates represents â€Å"how many people are homeless. The most widely cited example of a point-in-time estimate is the approximately 500,000-600,000 homeless people found in shelters, eating at soup kitchens, or congregating on the street during one week in 1988 (Burt and Cohen, 1989). 700,000+/night; 2 million/year (1999) The 500,000-600,000 estimate is sometimes updated by using a projected rate of increase of 5% a year to produce an estimate of over 700,000 people homeless on any given night, and up to 2 million people who experience homelessness during one year (National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty, 1999). In 1990, a national telephone survey identified formerly homeless people and produced life-time and five-year prevalence estimates of homelessness. Seven percent of the respondents reported that they had been literally homeless at some point in their lives, and three percent reported being homeless at some point between 1985-1990 (Link et al. ,1994). The Clinton Administration’s Priority Home! The Federal Plan to Break the Cycle of Homelessness uses this data, corrected to include children, to estimate that between 4. 95 million to 9. million people (with a mid-point of 7 million) experienced homelessness in the latter half of the 1980s. A second study was undertaken in 1994 to refine the analysis with more explicit definitions and detailed information. This study found that 6. 5% (12 million adults nationwide) of the respondents had been literally homeless at some point in their lives, and that 3. 6% (6. 6 million adults nationwide) of the respondents had experienced homelessness (literal or doubled up) between 1989-1994 (Link et al. , 1995). Thus, it appears that 12 million of the adult residents of the U. S. ve been literally homeless at some point in their lives. Dennis Culhane’s study of turnover rates in shelters in New York City and Philadelphia is another example of a period prevalence count. This study revealed that 3% of Philadelphia’s population used the public shelter system between 1990 and 1992, and that in New York, 3% of the population received shelter between 1988-1992 (Culhane et al. , 1994). The Culhane study also found that in New York City, a single shelter bed accomodates four different people in the course of a year; in Philadelphia, each bed accomodates six different persons per year. Because this study did not include persons in privately funded shelters or on the streets, the findings underestimate homelessness in both cities. A study by Martha Burt compared these rates with data from seven other jurisdictions (Burt, 1994). The comparison showed that the New York City and Philadelphia rates fall well within the range of data from other regions of the country. One limited measure of the growth in homelessness is the increase in the number of shelter beds over time. A 1991 study examined homelessness â€Å"rates† (the number of shelter beds in a city divided by the city’s population) in 182 U. S. cities with populations over 100,000. The study found that homelessness rates tripled between 1981 and 1989 for the 182 cities as a group (Burt, 1997). A 1997 review of research conducted over the past decade (1987-1997) in 11 communities and 4 states found that shelter capacity more than doubled in nine communities and three states during that time period (National Coalition for the Homeless, 1997). In two communities and two states, shelter capacity tripled over the decade. These numbers are useful for measuring the growth in demand for shelter beds (and the resources made available to respond to that growth) over time. They indicate a dramatic increase in homelessness in the United States over the past two decades. By its very nature, homelessness is impossible to measure with 100% accuracy. More important than knowing the precise number of people who experience homelessness is our progress in ending it. Recent studies suggest that the United States generates homelessness at a much higher rate than previously thought. Our task in ending homelessness is thus more important now than ever. The National Coalition for the Homeless provided leadership in the successful effort to pass the Stewart B. McKinney Homelessness Assistance Act in 1987. Since then, NCH has continued to monitor the reauthorization and appropriations process for McKinney Act programs and other programs affecting poor and homeless people. NCH supports legislation to provide an adequate supply of affordable housing, jobs which pay a living wage, and universal access to health care. Legislative Alerts Learn about homelessness-related legislation being considered by Congress and what you can do about it. General Homelessness Issues NCH’s 2000 Federal Legislative Agenda This document provides an overview of NCH’s federal legislative priorities for 2000, including housing, health, education, income, and civil rights. The McKinney Act The Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act was the first — and remains the only — major federal legislative response to homelessness. This fact sheet provides a brief history of the McKinney Act, describes its content and evolution, and summarizes recent trends in McKinney Act legislation and funding. Funding and Budget Issues Appropriations for Federal Homeless Programs Table of FY95-00 funding levels for homeless programs. FY2001 Budget and Homelessness This page summarizes the most recent budget and appropriations legislation and provides NCH’s recommended funding levels for federal homeless programs. Housing and Shelter Issues Community Housing Investment Trust Discusses key provisions of an NCH-sponsored initiative to create one million units of high-quality, affordable rental housing for persons whose annual incomes are less than the minimum wage, including persons with disabilities, elder age, or low-wage incomes. McKinney Side by Side Side by Side comparison of major components of proposals to amend HUD homeless legislation (July 2000). Housing and Welfare Reform: Background Information Prepared by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, this paper explores the impact of welfare policy on housing and the impact of housing policy on welfare. Welfare Issues Welfare to What: Early Findings on Family Hardship and Well-Being Published by the Children’s Defense Fund and the National Coalition for the Homeless in November 1998, this report examines the impacts on families two years after the signing of the federal welfare law. It presents national and local findings and compiles more than 30 state and local studies. The Executive Summary is available at http://nch. ari. net/w2wexec. html. The full report may be downloaded below. Welfare to What (Full Report – 246K) Note: To view this file, you will need Acrobat Reader. Using TANF to Reduce and Prevent Homelessness: Effective Practices and Strategies. Published in May 2000, this paper was written to provide specific examples of how states and communities have used TANF productively to reduce and prevent homelessness. Other Internet Resources on Welfare and Poverty Links to online organizations and sources of information on poverty and welfare. Education Issues School Segregation and Homeless Children and Youth This overview summarizes available information on integrated homeless education programs (those programs that help homeless children enroll, attend, and succeed in mainstream schools) and segregated classrooms or schools (those that separate homeless children from housed children on the basis of their homelessness alone). For more detailed information, including program examples, please see School Segregation and Homeless Children and Youth: Questions and Answers Reauthorization of the McKinney Act’s Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program Congress will consider legislation to reauthorize the McKinney Act’s Education of Homeless Children and Youth (EHCY) program in 1999. The EHCY program works to ensure homeless children and youth’s enrollment, attendance, and success in school. This page provides up-to-date information on reauthorization for advocates, teachers, service providers, and administrators, including analyses and summaries of reauthorization legislation, links to relevant committees, and more detailed action alerts. America’s Homeless Children: Will Their Future Be Different? A Survey of State Homeless Education Programs The McKinney Act is responsible for significant improvements in homeless children’s access to public education. However, increasing homelessness among families with children and a simultaneous reduction in federal funding threatened the progress that states and communities had made in helping homeless children and youth enroll, attend, and succeed in school. This 1997 40-state survey examines the accomplishments and challenges of homeless education programs faced with increasing demand for services and decreasing resources. Making the Grade: Successes and Challenges in Educating Homeless Children and Youth The 1996 Position Document of the National Association of State Coordinators for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth. This report summarizes the history and progress of efforts to educate homeless children and youth, profiles 30 selected state homeless education programs, and offers recommendations for improving the McKinney Education for Homeless Children and Youth program. Health Issues No Open Door: Breaking the Lock on Addiction Recovery for Homeless People This NCH report examines what has been learned in the last decade about the barriers that homeless people face in accessing addictive disorder services and the treatment and recovery interventions that are effective with the homeless population. The Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) Program Describes the function and accomplishments of the McKinney Act’s Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) program, as well as NCH’s recommendations for expanding and strengthening PATH. Homeless Treatment and Recovery Competitive Grant Program Describes NCH’s initiative to reauthorize and appropriate funds for a national competitive grant program to develop and expand addictive and mental disorder treatment and recovery opportunities for homeless persons with addictive and mental disorders Increased Demand, Decreased Supply: Challenges to the McKinney Act’s Health Care for the Homeless Program Changes in the health care marketplace, in public policy, and in the face of homelessness itself are creating new demand for health services for homeless people according to this study published by the National Health Care for the Homeless Council and the federal Bureau of Primary Health Care. How to cite The â€Å"Homeless†, Papers

Thursday, April 30, 2020

Lord Of The Flies By William Golding Essays (700 words)

Lord Of The Flies By William Golding In Wiliiam Golding's book The Lord of the Flies, two running themes are innocence and the loss of it and the fear of the unknown. Another way to describe the fear of the unknown could be man ultimately reverting back to an evil and primitive nature. The cycle of man's rise to power and his inevitable fall from grace is an important point that book proves again and again. Lord Of The Flies symbolizes this fall in different manners, ranging from the illustration of the mentality of actual primitive man to the reflections of a corrupt seaman in purgatory. The novel is the story of a group of boys of different backgrounds who are marooned on an unknown island when their plane crashes. As the boys try to organize and formulate a plan to get rescued, they begin to separate and as a result of the dissension a band of savage tribal hunters is formed. Eventually the stranded boys almost entirely shake off civilized behavior. When the confusion finally leads to a manhunt for Ralph, it shows that the boys have backpedaled and shown the underlying savage side existent in all humans, despite the strong sense of British character and civility that has been instilled in the youth throughout their lives. The novel shows the reader how easy it is to revert back to the evil nature inherent in man. If a group of well-conditioned school boys can ultimately wind up committing various extreme travesties, one can imagine what adults, leaders of society, are capable of doing under the pressures of trying to maintain world relations. In the novel, Simon is a peaceful lad who tries to show the boys that there is no monster on the island except the fears that the boys have. Simon tries to state the truth that there is a beast, but "it's only us" (Golding 11). When he makes this revelation, he doesn't know what to really make of it. Later in the story, the savage hunters are chasing a pig. Once they kill the pig, they put its head on a stick and Simon experiences an epiphany in which he understands more about the beast. After Simon discovers what the boys think the beast is he rushes to the campfire to tell the boys of his discovery. As Simon comes to the campfire he is hit in the side with a spear, his prophecy rejected and the word he wished to spread ignored. Simon falls to the ground dead and is described as beautiful and pure. Simon faced his loss of innocence abruptly when he was stabbed repeatedly. His loss of innocence is a big realization for some of the other boys an the loss of thier innocence. William Golding discusses man's capacity for fear and cowardice. In the novel, the boys on the island first encounter a natural fear of being stranded on an uncharted island without the counsel of adults. Once the boys begin to organize and begin to feel more adult-like themselves, the fear of monsters takes over. It is understandable that boys ranging in ages from toddlers to young teenagers would have fears of monsters, especially when it is taken into consideration that the children are stranded on the island. The author wishes to show, however, that fear is an emotion that is instinctive and active in humans from the very beginnings of their lives. This revelation uncovers another weakness in man, supporting the idea or belief that man is savage at the very core of his existence. As the boys fear the unknown more more, a savage side prevails over thier better. An example would be toward the end of the book when Jack sacrifices everyones chance for survival on the island to try and kill Ralph. The author uses these instincts to prove the point that any type of uncontrolled fear contributes to man's instability and will ultimately lead to his demise spiritually and perhaps even physically. Man grows more savage at heart as he evolves because of his cowardice and his quest for power. The novel proves this by throwing together opposing forces into a situation that dowses them with power struggles and frightening situations. By comparing mankind in general to Biblical characters in similar scenarios, the novel provides images of the darker side of man. This darker side of man's nature inevitably wins and man is proven to be a pathetic race that refuses to accept responsibility for its shortcomings.

Saturday, March 21, 2020

Chicken Pox essays

Chicken Pox essays What do you think of when you here the term chicken pox? Probably a very itchy time in you life or an itchy time waiting ahead for you, unless you are one of the few lucky ones. I know catching chicken pox probably wasnt the greatest time in your life but almost everyone has to go though it. Its reminds me of getting your shots before you can begin school, you hate getting them, but you are told its a necessity. Before the sixth century shingles, a secondary infection of chicken pox was identified. Then after the nineteen century chicken pox was identified as a separate disease from the smallpox disease. In 1995 the United States Food and Drug Administration approved the first vaccine against chicken pox. This came after extreme testing in Japan which showed there was no lingering effects. Even though the vaccine is in use today and is proven to be safe, it is still under debate if it should be used and if it Chicken pox is caused by the varicalla-zoster virus (VZV). Chicken pox is very contagious, approximately four million cases occur each year. Breathing in sneezed air by someone who is infected with chicken pox is the most common way this disease is The most obvious symptom is a itchy rash which starts on the body and scalp and spreads to the face, arms, and legs. This rash forms blisters that dry and become scabs in four to five days. An infected person may have anywhere from only a few scabs to more than five hundred scabs on his or her body during and attack. When you get the rash you should have a doctor examine it. Rashes have many different causes, this is why it is best to have a doctor diagnose the disease. He or she might ask about contact with other children who have chicken pox or measles or other Rashes arent the only sign of chicken pox, a person migh ...

Chicken Pox essays

Chicken Pox essays What do you think of when you here the term chicken pox? Probably a very itchy time in you life or an itchy time waiting ahead for you, unless you are one of the few lucky ones. I know catching chicken pox probably wasnt the greatest time in your life but almost everyone has to go though it. Its reminds me of getting your shots before you can begin school, you hate getting them, but you are told its a necessity. Before the sixth century shingles, a secondary infection of chicken pox was identified. Then after the nineteen century chicken pox was identified as a separate disease from the smallpox disease. In 1995 the United States Food and Drug Administration approved the first vaccine against chicken pox. This came after extreme testing in Japan which showed there was no lingering effects. Even though the vaccine is in use today and is proven to be safe, it is still under debate if it should be used and if it Chicken pox is caused by the varicalla-zoster virus (VZV). Chicken pox is very contagious, approximately four million cases occur each year. Breathing in sneezed air by someone who is infected with chicken pox is the most common way this disease is The most obvious symptom is a itchy rash which starts on the body and scalp and spreads to the face, arms, and legs. This rash forms blisters that dry and become scabs in four to five days. An infected person may have anywhere from only a few scabs to more than five hundred scabs on his or her body during and attack. When you get the rash you should have a doctor examine it. Rashes have many different causes, this is why it is best to have a doctor diagnose the disease. He or she might ask about contact with other children who have chicken pox or measles or other Rashes arent the only sign of chicken pox, a person migh ...

Chicken Pox essays

Chicken Pox essays What do you think of when you here the term chicken pox? Probably a very itchy time in you life or an itchy time waiting ahead for you, unless you are one of the few lucky ones. I know catching chicken pox probably wasnt the greatest time in your life but almost everyone has to go though it. Its reminds me of getting your shots before you can begin school, you hate getting them, but you are told its a necessity. Before the sixth century shingles, a secondary infection of chicken pox was identified. Then after the nineteen century chicken pox was identified as a separate disease from the smallpox disease. In 1995 the United States Food and Drug Administration approved the first vaccine against chicken pox. This came after extreme testing in Japan which showed there was no lingering effects. Even though the vaccine is in use today and is proven to be safe, it is still under debate if it should be used and if it Chicken pox is caused by the varicalla-zoster virus (VZV). Chicken pox is very contagious, approximately four million cases occur each year. Breathing in sneezed air by someone who is infected with chicken pox is the most common way this disease is The most obvious symptom is a itchy rash which starts on the body and scalp and spreads to the face, arms, and legs. This rash forms blisters that dry and become scabs in four to five days. An infected person may have anywhere from only a few scabs to more than five hundred scabs on his or her body during and attack. When you get the rash you should have a doctor examine it. Rashes have many different causes, this is why it is best to have a doctor diagnose the disease. He or she might ask about contact with other children who have chicken pox or measles or other Rashes arent the only sign of chicken pox, a person migh ...